CRASH LANDING OF A LANCASTER BOMBER ON HANBURY FARMLAND

CRASH LANDING OF A LANCASTER BOMBER ON HANBURY FARMLAND

9 Feb 2019 • Other News

On Saturday 9 February, lay minister John Spencer led a SERVICE IN THE VERNON CHAPEL TO COMMEMORATE THE SEVENTY FIFTH ANNIVERSARY OF THE CRASH LANDING OF A LANCASTER BOMBER ON HANBURY FARMLAND, in which eight young Canadian airmen lost their lives. Details can be found at the church war memorial.

On 11 February 1944, the plane’s engine was observed to be on fire over Stoke Prior and Hanbury Mount, after which local people drove out to witness the sorrowful crash site, returning home with heavy hearts. This had been a training exercise, but such scenes were not uncommon throughout the country during the war years. During the commemoration, the Stoke RBL Legion standard was lowered by Gary as ‘The Last Post’ was sounded, followed by the silence and reveille. Branch chairman David Hosford presented certificates in recognition of war related research. Members of this longstanding caring organisation provide ongoing support for people in our community, keeping the memory of their ‘service’ alive and being alongside them through illness and other difficulties. Support for this charity will be very much appreciated.

ON 6 FEBRUARY, THE LAST POPPY WAS ATTACHED TO A SOLDIER’S STAND AT THE PARISH CHURCH WAR MEMORIAL. Private Hubert Barley died on that day one hundred years ago, aged 32 years. As a child he lived at ‘Bartlems’, later working as a ‘cow boy’ at Harry Gibbs Farm in Pumphouse Lane and eventually finding employment as a driver in Bromsgrove.

As the Great War display becomes a more compact ‘archive’ for visitor reference, there will be the opportunity to gather fresh information relating to the seventieth anniversary of World War Two’s declaration and the war itself. The brief period of peacetime between the wars has become shockingly evident